Exploring Graffiti's Journey from Illegal to Commercial

deTour curated by: Unimelb, 2015

In the last 20 years the public view of graffiti has shifted from conceptions of decay and vandalism, into a sphere of popular culture, allowing the commercial sale and advertisement through "street art" mediums. There still remains an unknown cut off whence graffiti ceases to be vandalistic as an unwanted form of representation, transforming into an accepted form of art and expression. Without attempting to define, but rather explore, this tour endeavours to take the journey from the streets to the cafe's and galleries, tracing both graffiti and street art's illegal origins to its place in accepted popular culture.

Locations for deTour

This stop is not geographically specific and is more about freely exploring the conversation taking place in the general area. While walking along the cobble stone lanes, you may notice a word or form that appears to dominate or periodically appear,…

In a similar respect to Stop A, here the alley provides an open amphitheatre perspective of illegal graffiti. On close inspection you can notice a thick layer of paint on nearly all surfaces, even those which are abrasive or heavily textured, and,…

This street corner is home to more heavy tagging, however, the private owners of the corner residence have began to commission artists to create larger legal and more recognisable images and forms in an effort to minimise "tagging" and…

This space takes a step from mostly illegal to commissioned works. Murals and pieces are large and as colourful as they are diverse, with respect shown from other artists by keeping artworks uncontested. Usually the works exist for sometime and are…

Beginning outside in the car park, take a look at the large mural of young Singaporean Chris holding a bowl with a burning house standing in it. This piece required scaffolding and three days of access, the artist is apparently making a comment on…
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