A Walk through Changing Mainstream Aesthetic Culture

deTour curated by: Unimelb, 2015

Psychogeography is the practice of exploring the urban environment while being led by curiosity and a paused sense of time and place[1]. I am going to take you on a walking tour to 5 locations starting at the corner of Toorak Road and Chapel Street, through to the Windsor end, which after drifting through, I noticed a shift in age and characteristics of inhabitants and a change in the aesthetic mainstream culture.

[1] Psychogeography. (n.d.). Retrieved May 22, 2015, fromhttp://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=psychogeography

Locations for deTour

This end of Chapel St contains no significant street art and instead consists of many clean, conventional, conservative and nationwide shops. From large concrete building structures and clothing stores such as Country Road, Saba and Scanlan and…

The Jam factory on the other hand is likely to appeal to a younger age group, and in particular those still at school (photo unfortunately was taken in school hours). I personally spent much of my teen years growing up here because it is a…

As you arrive at Greville St and move further along Chapel and the backstreets, you will observe a gradual transition to individual boutique, vintage and opp shops, book and music stores and a “huge number of cool bars and clubs intermixed with…

St Edmonds epitomizes a trendy breakfast and brunch café with an industrial chic aesthetic. The once garage still has the original brick walls, old roller door and exposed metal pipes and air ducts which when combined with the denim aprons worn by…

Artist Lane, also known as Aerosol Alley is like a city-style hidden laneway in Windsor- a type of place that ‘if you know, you know’. It originally started with local resident Wayne Tindal who wanted to convert the “laneway with rats and…
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